1. New Post: TCé picks: A selection of things to do and places to go – February 2013

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/featured/tce-picks-a-selection-of-things-to-do-and-places-to-go-february-2013/

    TCé picks: A selection of things to do and places to go – February 2013

    As far as we’re concerned, February is the official start of the culture calendar – so we’re happy that this month has quite a few entertaining going-ons in store, from charity danceathons to an opportunity to go to your very own prom.  Plus, tune into the site later for an announcement of a  brilliant  competition courtesy of our generous friends over at the Roxy Bar & Cinema…

     Music

    Ali Shaheed Muhammad at Jazz Cafe, February 1st - The former member of  the pioneering A Tribe Called Quest drops into Camden for a Friday night party for lovers of hip-hop, R&B and soul.

    Alternative

    Meet Mutsa danceathon, February 9th  - This fun and quirky social activist has been doing her part in London to raise awareness of the HIV pandemic in sub-saharan Africa through educational projects, and her latest event sees her organise an international danceathon fundraiser in London and New York City.  One of the teachers who’ll be putting participants through their paces is Zoo Nation choreographer Kate Prince (Into the Hoods, Some Like It Hip-Hop), so you’ll know this will be brilliant (and all for a good cause!).

     Cinema

    Future Cinema presents Casablanca, February 14th – March 3th -  The creators of Secret Cinema will be presenting the iconic Casablanca, where you’ll step into the world of Rick’s American Café at the Troxy which will be transformed into the famous, exclusive and romantic nightclub. Immersive cinema at its finest.

    The Book Club

    Alternative

    Teen Dreams Prom at The Book Club, February 14 - Ever wondered what it’d be like to go to prom? Wonder no more on Valentine’s Day as The Book Club are throwing a fancy dress knees-up for couples and friends to experience prom first hand. There will be games, American food and even a final crowning of Prom King and Queen.

    Arts & Culture

     Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at Tate Modern, February 21st – May 27th - Roy Lichtenstein is one of the leading figures of American Pop art, and this show brings together 125 of his most definitive paintings and sculptures.

    Best bits from last month

    Something You Should See… Light Show, Hayward Gallery
    What we’ve been up to… Patty & Bun
    Something you should see… 35 mm: A Musical Exhibition
    Send us your “selfies” and win places on a Culture Club Photography Workshop!
    Something you should see… Feast at the Young Vic
    Something you should see… One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show
    Somewhere you should eat… The Shed
     

  2. New Post: Something You Should See… Narratives of Arrival and Resolution, Art Space Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-narratives-of-arrival-and-resolution-art-space-gallery/

    Something You Should See… Narratives of Arrival and Resolution, Art Space Gallery

    If you’re a self-confessed perfectionist out there who swoons over clean-cut lines and shiver with satisfaction at exact tessellation, Art Space Gallery is the place for you this month. Curator Deanna Petherbridge has brought together a selection of works by four abstract artists who appear to share your passion for precision, in new exhibition Narratives of Arrival and Resolution.

    First up – Belinda Cadbury and her meticulously pencilled patterns on paper. Cadbury’s work is about craft and process, rather than creativity and imagination, and each work is carefully executed, tightly finished and smudge-free. But the uneven densities of the markings within each of her carefully demarcated forms betray the personal labour that went into each of the works, without ever undermining the integrity of the design and its rhythm.

    Alison Turnbull and Sarah Cawkwell both seek existing patterns in our everyday lives and, lifting them from their original contexts, isolate or re-work them to explore their aesthetic potential free of meaning. Turnbull’s interests lie in the topographical, in maps, charts and graphs. Her systematically placed dots and lines interact with the systems of her sources, and invigorate the page surface in playful and enchanting ways. Cawkwell turns to the domestic. A lot of her artistic practice comprises relatively uninteresting, middle-of-the-road charcoal renderings of dressing and undressing rituals, but Petherbridge has astutely selected only those works which dissolve the figurative into abstract patterning. Woven textiles, buttons and the folds and creases of fabric serve as departure points for lovingly rendered small-scale studies in pencil and wash.

    The highlight is set to be Wendy Smith, who lacerates her dazzling white boards with inked lines which cross and merge to form intricate, interlocking patterns that shimmer and dance on the page. Smith’s drawings have a graphic quality and are so frighteningly free of imperfection it is easy to imagine them to be machine-made. Together in series Smith’s work looks like the result of hundreds of experiments in drawing, but experiments with no hypothesis, no analysis and no evaluation.

    Smith’s works, as with the others shown at the gallery, are not reliant on theory. They do not purport to communicate any personal or objective reality to us but rather express the artists’ fascination with mark making itself. The crisp, clean visual clarity of the works at Art Space Gallery provide the ultimate in visual satisfaction and are not to be missed. (Words: Florence Ritter) 

    Narratives of Arrival and Resolution runs 25th January – 22nd February. You can see the catalogue for the exhibition here: www.artspacegallery.co.uk/BOOKS/Narratives/pageflip.html

     

  3. New Post: Something you should see… Juergen Teller’s Woo at ICA

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-juergen-tellers-woo-at-ica/

    Something you should see… Juergen Teller’s Woo at ICA

    A retrospective of an iconic fashion photographer? This couldn’t be further up our street here at The Cultural Exposé. That it also includes images from the photographer’s home life makes this all the more intriguing. But then again, in many ways, Juergen Teller has been giving us an insight into himself for some time now as he has often appeared in his own photographs.


    Teller started out in music photography making his name with the cover of Sinead O’Connor’s Nothing Compares 2 U – a Mona Lisa-esque ambivalent pose, suggesting either ‘I’m hurt and alone’ (most likely) and ‘What the f**k are you looking at?’ (an equally distinct possibility for our Sinead). Following that, Teller set about changing the very nature of fashion photography. Featured in this exhibition is his work for designer Marc Jacobs, a tranche of work which featured Teller himself, as naked as the day he was born, flouncing about on a bed with the arch-raunch herself, Charlotte Rampling. Here, you can see Teller curled up in the foetal position clutching the hand of a serene and distant Rampling. It is this playfulness that has marked Teller out as a distinctive operator, his images both meant as a bit of fun but also raw and unabashed.


    That he enjoys playing with the viewer and has a self-deprecating sense of humour is also illustrated by the exhibition’s inclusion  of the many complaints he received while completing his weekly column for Die Zeit. You get the feeling that Teller couldn’t care less about the criticism. In fact, if anything he relishes it and being provocative is what sets him apart. Doubtless if there was no criticism he would have to do so something that would garner some gainsaying.

    But that doesn’t mean that Teller is a sensationalist. Far from it. He does things because he likes to experiment and his very free approach brings out the experimental in his subjects, and it all makes for compelling, unusual and quite wonderful photography. (Words: Ed Spencer) 

    Woo is on from 23 January 2013 – 17 March 2013 For more info visit:  www.ica.org.uk/34587/Exhibitions/Juergen-Teller-Woo.html

     

  4. New Post: Something you should see… Feast at the Young Vic

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/recommendations/something-you-should-see/something-you-should-see-feast-at-the-young-vic/

    Something you should see… Feast at the Young Vic

    The month of January can be quite depressing after all the Christmas excess. Money is tight, daylight is still short, it’s cold (!), resolutions are made (and broken)… need I go on?
    Well a new production at London’s Young Vic theatre is offering a bit of winter cheer. Directed by Rufus Norris, Feast celebrates Yoruba culture and religion in a journey from West Africa via the Americas to contemporary London through the adventures of three sisters. With choreography from George Cespedes of Contemporanea de Cuba fame and live music, this ambitious production promises something quite spectacular for audiences.

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Actor Kobna Holdbrook-Smith returns to the Young Vic for the production – playing the trickster god Esu and is joined by Olivier Award-winning actress Noma Dumezweni.
    For this co-production with the Royal Court, Rufus Norris worked with playwrights from five countries where Yoruba traditions have influenced contemporary life. Included in this collaborative effort are Brazilian Marcos Barbosa, American Tanya Barfield, Rotimi Babatunde of Nigeria, Cuban Yunior Garcia Aguilera and Brit Gbolahan Obisesan. Norris is no stranger to the African continent, having spent quite a few childhood years in Nigeria when his civil servant father was posted to Africa.

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Anyone familiar with the work of Norris will know he has directed a host of critically acclaimed shows including Cabaret, London Road and an adaptation of DBC Pierre’s novel Vernon God Little. So, here’s a theatre director with some versatility who’s spoken of taking the audience on a journey with Feast. The show’s promotional tagline is Feed your spirit, Free yourself – and that sounds quite good for January. (Words: Eri Otite)

    Feast is showing at the Young Vic from 25 January – 23 February. For more info, visit www.youngvic.org

     

  5. New Post: Something you should see… Feast at the Young Vic

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/recommendations/something-you-should-see/something-you-should-see-feast-at-the-young-vic/

    Something you should see… Feast at the Young Vic

    The month of January can be quite depressing after all the Christmas excess. Money is tight, daylight is still short, it’s cold (!), resolutions are made (and broken)… need I go on?
    Well a new production at London’s Young Vic theatre is offering a bit of winter cheer. Directed by Rufus Norris, Feast celebrates Yoruba culture and religion in a journey from West Africa via the Americas to contemporary London through the adventures of three sisters. With choreography from George Cespedes of Contemporanea de Cuba fame and live music, this ambitious production promises something quite spectacular for audiences.

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Actor Kobna Holdbrook-Smith returns to the Young Vic for the production – playing the trickster god Esu and is joined by Olivier Award-winning actress Noma Dumezweni.
    For this co-production with the Royal Court, Rufus Norris worked with playwrights from five countries where Yoruba traditions have influenced contemporary life. Included in this collaborative effort are Brazilian Marcos Barbosa, American Tanya Barfield, Rotimi Babatunde of Nigeria, Cuban Yunior Garcia Aguilera and Brit Gbolahan Obisesan. Norris is no stranger to the African continent, having spent quite a few childhood years in Nigeria when his civil servant father was posted to Africa.

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Pic: Richard Hubert Smith

    Anyone familiar with the work of Norris will know he has directed a host of critically acclaimed shows including Cabaret, London Road and an adaptation of DBC Pierre’s novel Vernon God Little. So, here’s a theatre director with some versatility who’s spoken of taking the audience on a journey with Feast. The show’s promotional tagline is Feed your spirit, Free yourself – and that sounds quite good for January. (Words: Eri Otite)

    Feast is showing at the Young Vic from 25 January – 23 February. For more info, visit www.youngvic.org

     

  6. New Post: TCé picks: Review of the Year (Eri Otite)

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/what-to-do-in-london/tce-picks-review-of-the-year-eri-otite/

    TCé picks: Review of the Year (Eri Otite)

    In the run-up to 2013, The Cultural Exposé team share their favourite highlights of 2012 and something they’re looking forward to in the New Year:

    William Klein & Daido Moriyama at Tate Modern, October 2012

    William Klein

    “I enjoyed the exhibition for the wealth of work on display and the pleasant surprises. Moriyama’s harsh, sober portraits of Tokyo provided a perfect contrast to Klein’s energetic vision of New York. As someone who’s interested in the use of text in art, Klein’s wooden panel paintings of abstract letters were a bonus. I knew he’d started out as a painter but my knowledge of Klein was through his work as a photographer and filmmaker. I like him even more now.”

    Something I’m looking forward to in 2013: Juergen Teller’s Woo at the ICA, January 23rd- March 17th 2013

    Juergen Teller

    “A bit of fashion escapism to banish the winter blues from the influential artist and photographer.”

     

  7. New Post: Halstead & Kerr: Harmattan Cluster at Anarch Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/halstead-kerr-harmattan-cluster-at-anarch-gallery/

    Halstead & Kerr: Harmattan Cluster at Anarch Gallery

    I do love a bit of conceptual art though sometimes the language used can be baffling. I confess I’m not quite sure of the meaning of “seeking to find the lens through which they inspect and which in turn delineates the implied thing as a cluster of possible emancipatory connections”. I am intrigued though.

    If you’re still with me, surphysics is the subject matter here of this exhibition, and is a really rather heartening attempt to create a safe space within the memory banks. It’s a quite lovely idea. Like a self-decimating Russian doll or a dog chasing its own tail, Surphysics seeks to re-understand the source of thought, how we process it, how that is stored, and how it is remembered. It’s a chicken ‘n’ egg take on memory and the creation of that memory.

    The artists, Halstead & Kerr, are members of Solina Hi-Fi, a gaggle of artists and music merchants involved in any manner of pursuit – a 24 hour Olympic marathon being a particular achievement. And a focus on collaboration is of importance to Anarch, the space in Deptford which this exhibition features. It seeks to find new spaces to create site-specific work that challenges the artists’ own modus operandi. Here, it is Halstead & Kerr who are challenged to develop alternative work practices –  though I think I’ll let their art do the talking rather than their words. (Words: Ed Spencer) 

    Harmattan Cluster runs until January 26th.  For more info, visit  www.anarch.co.uk

     

  8. Somewhere you should go… The Bush Theatre

    Happy Birthday to The Bush Theatre! Established in 1972, The Bush doesn’t let a little thing like 40 years slow it down because, as we all know, there are benefits that come with age. When you get glammed up for a night out with this middled-aged wonder you don’t just get one experience -  oh no, you get three.

    Number one is the theatre itself, an intimate space where the best new talent in playwriting is offered up for your enjoyment. And when I say the best, I mean it; the folks at The Bush are sent over 1000 scripts a year and read every one of them. With so many writers clamouring to be produced it is you, the audience, who ends up absolutely spoilt for choice.

    Next we have the bar, which provides a relaxed scene where you can indulge in pre-drinks and post-show chat. The staff are friendly and well-versed in ‘what’s on’ at the theatre and - most importantly if you enjoy a night out on the cheap like me -  the drinks are reasonably priced and the snacks delicious.

    Completing our hat-trick is the library; a big room just off the main entrance, crammed with mismatched tables and arm-chairs and bookshelf upon bookshelf of plays. There is everything to suit your tastes from well-known classics to modern niche scripts and as The Bush opens early and closes late you’re left plenty of time to grab a coffee, snuggle down into a chair and peruse at your leisure.

    Tickets range from £10- £20 with discounts for nearly everyone including young, old and local. For more information and bookings go to: www.bushtheatre.co.uk (Words: Beth Downey) 

     

  9. (Source: addtoany.com)

     

  10. Somewhere you should go… Drink, Shop & Do

    Much love to Culture Club member @EsmeDora for suggesting we check out this new design bar and cafe in Kings Cross! Set in a former Victorian bathouse, Drink, Shop & Do sells charming vintage wares and creations from local designers, but also doubles up as an arts and craft club and sweet shop for creative urbanites who want a casual spot to hang out after work. I think we’re in love :-) www.drinkshopdo.com  (9 Caledonian Road, London N1 9DX Closest tube: King’s Cross) 

    Check out our photo gallery on Tumblr…