1. New Post: TCé picks: A selection of things to do and places to go - March 2013

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/what-to-do-in-london/tce-picks-a-selection-of-things-to-do-and-places-to-go-march-2013/

    TCé picks: A selection of things to do and places to go - March 2013

    It feels like it’s been the longest winter ever, but these lighter mornings and warmer days are giving us plenty of reason to expect Spring any  minute now – but until then, we’ve got an incredible collection of cultural highlights this March to also look forward to…

    Art & Culture

    Wild Card 2013: Ivan Blackstock at Sadler’s Wells, March 14-15th -  The UK hip-hop dancer/choreographer from the BirdCage Dance Company will be presenting a dynamic evening of his works in the Sadler’s third Wild Card series.

    Art & Culture

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    Bruno Vergauwen

    Art in Mind: Beauty Never Sleeps at The Brick Lane Gallery, March 13-24th – Art in Mind offers a platform for new and established artists to showcase their latest works – this month, it features the gothic illustrations of Belgian artist Bruno Vergauwen and works from Ian Treherne.

    Cinema

    Reincarnated screening + Q&A with Vice magazine global editor and director Andy Capper at Curzon Soho, March 22nd – Here’s an opportunity to see how Snoop Dogg became Snoop Lion, in this doc which follows the rapper’s quest to embrace Jamaica’s rasta culture before producing his reggae album.  Tickets for the screening available from midday on Wednesday, March 6th.

    Alternative

    Wilfred Bagshaw’s Time Emporium, March 22-23rd– Described as an “immersive theatrical gaming adventure and warehouse party”, the guys behind the Winterwell Festival will be transporting revelers back to a bygone era (1381) where they’ll play the chronological adventurer and go on special assignments before partying their cares away.

     Alternative

    Supa Dupa Fly’s Karaoke ‘N’ Quiz, last Thursday of every month – If you know your Big Daddy Kanes from your B.I.Gs, hot step to this new monthly quiz night for hip-hop heads at the Bedroom Bar in Shoreditch.

    Best bits from last month

    What we’ve been up to… Meatmission 

    Something you should see… Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at Tate Modern

    Something you should see… Becoming Picasso: Paris 1901 at The Courtauld Gallery, Somerset House

    What we’ve been up to… Elk in the Woods

    Something you should see… Paper Cinema at BAC

     

  2. New Post: Something you should see…Alan Brooks: City, MOTInternational

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-alan-brooks-city-motinternational/

    Something you should see…Alan Brooks: City, MOTInternational

    London-dwellers, you and I can count ourselves among more than 80% of the British population now living in urban areas. Our own beloved city is the most diverse of Britain’s urban centres, with over a third of its population born outside of the UK. With so many people on the move around an increasingly globalised world, cities and their cultural identities are changing at a faster rate than ever before. Does there remain any collective idea of the city itself? Alan Brooks’ third exhibition at MOT International’s London gallery space is an exploration of the concept of the city, our personal perceptions of it, and what it might mean to us to inhabit one today.

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    No less than one hundred drawings spread across a single black-painted wall of the small gallery. They vary in size and in content: images taken from gossip magazines and from newspapers are set beside floor plans and architectural drawings, and literary fragments sit with the toilet-wall scrawlings of an anonymous small-time vandal. Every one of them is carefully rendered in pencil crayon on paper – so we are told, but it’s hard to believe. Brooks deftly manipulates his simple materials to produce a startlingly broad range of effects to match the array of source materials on show.

    Previous works by Brooks have exhibited the same eye-popping levels of labour. In his last show at MOTInternational, Brooks showed 48 pencilled portraits of an (all-male) selection of artists in front of their most famous artworks. Brooks was working from images of securely canonised, artist stars of the twentieth century and although his careful copies were technically impressive, they didn’t offer any new dimension to the sources. Brooks’ City, with its sprawling collection of cultural artefacts, is more open to interpretation.

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    Brooks was inspired by The City: A Vision in Woodcuts, a striking pictorial novel by Belgian engraver Frans Masereel. Masereel’s bold, chunky Expressionist prints are formally a world away from Brooks’ obsessive, tightly executed pencil drawings. However both artists are united in navigating a path through the infinite narratives and histories embedded in the urban environment, and attempting to capture what it is to live in a City. (Words: Florence Ritter) 

    Alan Brooks: City, MOT International is on until  30th March 2013. For more info, visit: http://www.motinternational.org/alan-brooks

     

  3. New Post: Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-two-plus-two-signal-gallery/

    Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    The small but perfectly formed Signal Gallery in the heart of Shoreditch is at again. Having just been down there for an exhibition by Brooklyn street artist RAE, I have to say I was itching to get back. Happily, the clever folks at the gallery have come up with yet another tasty morsel for your artistic delectation.
    Two Plus Two is an exhibition that features two painters from the States and two street artists from dear old Blighty, and it promises to be very special. At first glance it might seem like some sort of aesthetic face-off but in fact the four have been chosen for their complimentary styles. Bael, from England’s northeast, is a painter whose dramatic pieces combine sexuality with menace, and exemplary linework. Michael Jankowski, a Chicago-based artist, also demonstrates this skill, while his work has an ethereal, almost distant quality to it.

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    Net by SPQR

    Joe Iurato, from New Jersey, has gained recognition for his striking street art and installations. The subtle menace seen in Bael’s work is very much evident here – a faceless hooded man is a constant – alongside dabbling in a kind of a portraiture – his Tom Waites is remarkable. And for the final helping in this finely balanced Michelin-star meal is SPQR, a Bristolian stencil artist who has exhibited at the gallery before. Unsurprisingly perhaps, his work combines humour with darkness, his menace more joyous, and the perfect addition to the spectrum of work on offer.

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    Michal Janowski

    All in all, this is a well crafted exhibition, and a real opportunity to see four young artists plying their trade in different but complimentary ways, and all under the same tiny roof. (Words: Ed Spencer) 

    Two Plus Two is on until March 15th.  For more info visit www.signalgallery.com

     

  4. New Post: Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-two-plus-two-signal-gallery/

    Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    The small but perfectly formed Signal Gallery in the heart of Shoreditch is at again. Having just been down there for an exhibition by Brooklyn street artist RAE, I have to say I was itching to get back. Happily, the clever folks at the gallery have come up with yet another tasty morsel for your artistic delectation.
    Two Plus Two is an exhibition that features two painters from the States and two street artists from dear old Blighty, and it promises to be very special. At first glance it might seem like some sort of aesthetic face-off but in fact the four have been chosen for their complimentary styles. Bael, from England’s northeast, is a painter whose dramatic pieces combine sexuality with menace, and exemplary linework. Michael Jankowski, a Chicago-based artist, also demonstrates this skill, while his work has an ethereal, almost distant quality to it.

     photo

    Net by SPQR

    Joe Iurato, from New Jersey, has gained recognition for his striking street art and installations. The subtle menace seen in Bael’s work is very much evident here – a faceless hooded man is a constant – alongside dabbling in a kind of a portraiture – his Tom Waites is remarkable. And for the final helping in this finely balanced Michelin-star meal is SPQR, a Bristolian stencil artist who has exhibited at the gallery before. Unsurprisingly perhaps, his work combines humour with darkness, his menace more joyous, and the perfect addition to the spectrum of work on offer.

     photo

    Michal Janowski

    All in all, this is a well crafted exhibition, and a real opportunity to see four young artists plying their trade in different but complimentary ways, and all under the same tiny roof. (Words: Ed Spencer) 

    Two Plus Two is on until March 15th.  For more info visit www.signalgallery.com

     

  5. New Post: Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-two-plus-two-signal-gallery/

    Something You Should See… 2 + 2 at Signal Gallery

    The small but perfectly formed Signal Gallery in the heart of Shoreditch is at again. Having just been down there for an exhibition by Brooklyn street artist RAE, I have to say I was itching to get back. Happily, the clever folks at the gallery have come up with yet another tasty morsel for your artistic delectation.
    Two Plus Two is an exhibition that features two painters from the States and two street artists from dear old Blighty, and it promises to be very special. At first glance it might seem like some sort of aesthetic face-off but in fact the four have been chosen for their complimentary styles. Bael, from England’s northeast, is a painter whose dramatic pieces combine sexuality with menace, and exemplary linework. Michael Jankowski, a Chicago-based artist, also demonstrates this skill, while his work has an ethereal, almost distant quality to it.

     photo

    Net by SPQR

    Joe Iurato, from New Jersey, has gained recognition for his striking street art and installations. The subtle menace seen in Bael’s work is very much evident here – a faceless hooded man is a constant – alongside dabbling in a kind of a portraiture – his Tom Waites is remarkable. And for the final helping in this finely balanced Michelin-star meal is SPQR, a Bristolian stencil artist who has exhibited at the gallery before. Unsurprisingly perhaps, his work combines humour with darkness, his menace more joyous, and the perfect addition to the spectrum of work on offer.

     photo

    Michal Janowski

    All in all, this is a well crafted exhibition, and a real opportunity to see four young artists plying their trade in different but complimentary ways, and all under the same tiny roof. (Words: Ed Spencer) 

    Two Plus Two is on until March 15th.  For more info visit www.signalgallery.com

     

  6. New Post: Something you should see… Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at Tate Modern

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-lichtenstein-a-retrospective-at-tate-modern/

    Something you should see… Lichtenstein: A Retrospective at Tate Modern

    Up there with Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein is one of the most recognisable American modern artists going – and similarly the creator of some of the most bastardised work around. Most people are more likely to have seen his work emblazoned on a gift mug, a novelty T-shirt or a placemat, rather than an art gallery wall. So, the new Lichtenstein retrospective at the Tate Modern, the first of its kind for 20s years, comes as a pleasant surprise – and a pretty good opportunity for his fans.

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    Masterpiece, 1962 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

    Every good pop artist had a fascination with consumer culture and the visual language of the mass media; Lichtenstein was no different. Famed for his use of the old-fashioned comic strip to convey puns and innuendos, his work is both accessible and instantly recognisable. Most of his work carried his trademark humour, mimicking, with just a hint of irony, the two dimensional characters of popular culture.

    This opportunity to get up-close and personal with the work will also reveal his attention to detail, as we coloured his images with the same Ben-Day spots used in the printing process. This pain-staking process became a signature style for Lichtenstein for most of his career, even taking the dots into his large sculptures. Luckily, the entire artist’s oeuvre are explored in the show, which includes 125 works of his paintings and sculptures, giving a full dissection of the range of surfaces and materials he used to achieve his visions.

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    © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

    His prolific career, which ran into the 1990s, is often overlooked or reduced to a graphic composition, by the means of mass production he himself chose to highlight. Hopefully, this exhibition should serve to readdress this balance. A must-see. (Words: Laura Thornley)

    Lichtenstein: A Retrospective is on until May 27th. For more info visit: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/lichtenstein

     

  7. New Post: What we’ve been up to… Friday night at Sketch

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/recommendations/somewhere-you-should-go/what-weve-been-up-to-friday-night-at-sketch/

    What we’ve been up to… Friday night at Sketch

    Nothing says goodbye to the working week than a visit to Sketch, the playful Mayfair bar and restaurant which always has us feeling so grown and bougie whenever we pop in.   From the arty decor and menu to those toilet pods, we love how it does quirky so well – and sure,  you can easily blow a week’s wages on a tiny dinner-for-two, but we reckon a couple of desserts and a few cocktails never hurt anyone.  Treat a friend and head to the Gallery to try the popular Sketch Chocolat (£10) or the scrumptious Raspberry Shortbread (£8.50).
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    Pan-fried supreme chicken – tiny, but delicious! £22

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    Swiss chard ravioli, £16

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    Raspberry shortbread – with tapioca balls!

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    Sketch Chocolat

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    Sketch toilets – to boldly “go” in no way you’ve gone before!

     

  8. New Post: Something you should see….Robert Rauschenberg: Jammers, Gagosian Gallery

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-robert-rauschenberg-jammers-gagosian-gallery/

    Something you should see….Robert Rauschenberg: Jammers, Gagosian Gallery

    The Gagosian has been dealt some real blows in the past year, with Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, and most recently Yayoi Kusama upping sticks and leaving the gallery for pastures new. But whilst their brigade of contemporary Super Artists may have temporarily depleted in numbers, Gagosian continue to represent the estates of some of the 20th century’s most celebrated artists, including that of Robert Rauschenberg.

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    Mirage (Jammer) (detail), 1975

    Rauschenberg is best known for his textured painting/sculpture hybrids composed of found materials. They have featured cardboard boxes, newspapers, and even bedclothes (borrowed from an unsuspecting neighbour) which he splattered suggestively with paint and mounted on the wall to create the now-iconic Bed. His work is familiar to us as both powerfully rebellious and carefully planned, humble in materials but big in impact. Now showing at Gagosian’s Britannia Street gallery are works of quite a different tone: Rauschenberg’s Jammers, created in 1975 following the artist’s short trip to India.

    The Jammers are made of gauzy fabrics which seem to skim the walls, hanging weightlessly from pins or lightly strung from large, propped-up rattan poles. Broad quadrangular panels each dyed in a single, vivid colour are carefully stitched together: in Gull, deep blue is married with muted taupe, in Mirage, canary yellow with scarlet. The colours sing out into the stark white space from behind intervening layers of translucent muslin. Some of the pieces incorporate tin cans, scrubbed and shining, providing little punctuation marks to the big statements of colour. Although their aesthetic is certainly simpler and more elegant than Rauschenberg’s other work, the Jammers do not represent a total departure from previous projects. As their own breed of wall-based sculptural textiles they too refuse to be confined to one artistic category.

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    Untitled (Jammer) (detail), 1975

    Robert Rauchenberg: the artist who combined the media of sculpture and painting, the guy who erased the de Kooning, the lover of Jasper Johns and Cy Twombly. But also the artist who was sensible of the expressive power of raw materials and has a keen eye for colour. You might have thought that you knew Rauschenberg’s work relatively well. Jammers at Gagosian Gallery proves otherwise. (Words: Florence Ritter)

    Robert Rauchenberg: Jammers is on until March 28th. For more info, visit http://www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/robert-rauschenberg–february-16-2013

     

  9. New Post: Something you should see… Poster Art 150: London Underground’s Greatest Designs at the London Transport Museum

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/arts-culture/something-you-should-see-poster-art-150-london-undergrounds-greatest-designs-at-the-london-transport-museum/

    Something you should see… Poster Art 150: London Underground’s Greatest Designs at the London Transport Museum

    Whether you love or loathe the tube, it’s impossible to deny that the London Underground has commissioned some memorable artwork that has featured on its tunnel walls. So, as part of LU’s 150th anniversary celebrations, a new exhibition showcasing the best poster designs from the late 19th century ’til today is  on view at the London Transport Museum. The 150 posters (naturally) were selected from the Museum’s archive of over 3,000 designs by an independent panel and chosen to reflect the range of work created to advertise the Underground. However, like most things, I suspect there are some rather contentious inclusions! Visitors to the exhibition will have the opportunity to vote for the best poster on display, with the most popular one being revealed this Autumn.

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    © TfL from the London Transport Museum collection

    The show is arranged around themes that include famous London landmarks and events, to days out in the city and the countryside. Navigation of the Underground and “encouraging good behaviour on the network” are also exhibition topics. As for the posters themselves, well-known designs such as Man Ray’s Keeps London Going (1938) will feature alongside lesser-known works. Artwork from one of the most prolific and influential graphic designers of the 20th century, Edward McKnight Kauffer, is also being included. The American-born artist, whose designs referenced Cubism, Futurism and Surrealism, produced 140 posters in total for London Transport during the 20s and 30s. The last major London Underground poster retrospective was in 1963, so this is a rare chance to see the very best (arguably) of poster art produced for the world’s oldest subterranean railway. (Words: Eri Otite)

    Poster Art 150 is on at the London Transport Museum until October 1st. For more info, visit www.ltmuseum.co.uk

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    © TfL from the London Transport Museum collection

     

  10. New Post: What we’ve been up to… MEATMission

    http://www.theculturalexpose.co.uk/eat-drink/what-weve-been-up-to-meatmission/

    What we’ve been up to… MEATMission

    First, there was the truck (MeatWagon), followed by the pop-up (MeatEasy), then came the boozy diner (MEATLiquor),  the trendy outlet in Covent Garden (MEATMarket) and now a mission to convert anyone else who’s yet to experience the indulgent joy of a dirty MEAT burger. Kudos to food proprietor Yianni Papoutsis for his ability to re-conceptualise the humble American burger restaurant  over the last few years, and attempting to go one better with each creative iteration. With MEATMission, it’d seem the team are keen to push the boundaries on the cultural dining experience, presenting his acclaimed burgers in an East End venue for foodies and coolhunters who are as much about the trendiness of the locale as they are about the hype over the grub – so TCé were invited to find out what burger-lovers can expect from this new kid on the block.

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    Sticking up a middle finger to its former tenants ( a Christian mission), the venue’s subversive  theme goes in hard from the jump; the lighting’s incredibly low,  the “inbread” part of the menu is pitched at “sinners”, skeletons are depicted in the stained-glass ceiling breaking bread Last-Supper style – and of course, there’s an all-seeing eye thrown in. It’s a bold statement as even the menu offers a few gags (Bingo Wings, badoom-ching! And you may not want to know the colloquial meaning of “Monkey Fingers“), but it was hard to laugh off the bright red cocktail called, er, Time Of The Month (!?). Still, the Donkey Punch cocktail (ahem) made with  lime juice, ginger beer and absinthe and the fruity Tipping The Velvet (double-ahem), were thankfully, quality Plan Bs, even if their names leave much to be desired.

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    First impressions aside, the food itself had some impressive highlights. For starters, those monkey fingers and chilli cheese fries are an absolute-must – and while we were less wooed by the fried pickles (tempura-style, nothing remarkable), the currywurst served over fries was also a great choice.  As for mains, the red chilli burger and cheeseburger  were cool and just what you’d expect  (although a friend was slightly overwhelmed by the spiciness of the green chilli burger), but my hat goes off to the delicious brilliance that is the roast beef sundae.  It looks deceptively sweet, but this creation is simply garlic mash and gravy with roast beef, horseradish cream, topped with a cherry tomato.

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    Considering there are other burger outlets that are more notorious for their food (Patty & Bun, Lucky Chip and Honest Burgers),  time will tell if MEATMission‘s restaurant credentials can match the hipness of their brand. But it seems like the sort of venue that’ll make a killing on the weekends as it’s near the heart of most of the Shoreditch action, it’s not too pricey, the music’s good, there’s yummy cocktails and it  has the right kind of starters for grazing – what more could a food-loving coolhunter ask for?

    For more info, visit: www.meatmission.com

     

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